Research’s Circuitous Route

Click through for larger This past weekend Elise flew to Boston on a last-minute research trip.  Unfortunately in the rush to get to the archives she left her computer at the airport security… Continue reading

“…he has no choice but to become an outlaw.”

“When a man is denied the right to live the life he believes in he has no choice but to become an outlaw.” – Nelson Mandela in Long Walk to Freedom (1995) The… Continue reading

Reaching Out

A great deal of the research for this project has come from lesbian and gay archives. Scattered across the United States and Canada, they are treasure troves for historians of sexuality. Too few,… Continue reading

Weird or Wonderful?

This past week I met with Vancouver’s queer seniors writing collective Quirk-e to talk about a draft of an article I recently completed with the title: “Freak Wedding! Marriage as Postwar Lesbian Pleasure… Continue reading

Father Robert Clement’s Holy Union

Last week I wrote about Troy Perry, founder of the Metropolitan Community Church. At the same time Perry was building his church in Los Angeles, Father Robert Clement, an ordained priest of the… Continue reading

Troy Perry and the Metropolitan Community Church

In the summer of 2011 I rode my motorcycle around the U.S. in search of pre-1980 evidence of same-sex marriage for my book Outlaws to In-Laws. I made stops at queer and lesbian… Continue reading

Unsung Heroes

Archivists are the unsung heroes of the historical profession. They are made all the more special by the fact that in the lesbian and gay archives sector most are unpaid, or underpaid. Theirs… Continue reading

Crime Doesn’t Pay

I have always loved giving public talks. I love the challenge of writing a compelling narrative, and I love the rush of energy I get from an attentive audience who is usually pleased,… Continue reading

FREAK WEDDING! BRIDEGROOM IS A GIRL

[click for larger] The headline says it all. In the 1950s, lesbians were “freaks.” This was especially true of butch women who adopted a masculine working-class style. Their style alone communicated volumes: I… Continue reading